2006 challenge kid nano robot

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Lego, robots, and a group of kids. Sounds like an interesting combination, and that's just what we'll be doing this fall. My daughter is part of a First Lego League team that will be using Lego Mindstorms to accomplish a challenge and compete against other teams.

There are over 5, teams in North America alone! Posted by Christine on October 18, 4: One challenge is getting the kids to focus on all four areas that are part of the First Lego League challenge.

It's so much fun to work with the robot to run missions, how can I get them to realize that the research project is just as important? Posted by Christine on October 24, 6: For one part of the competition, the team has to do a presentation on the theme of this years' challenge. Posted by Christine on November 14, 1: Posted by Christine on November 28, 1: I'd seen the reviews but hadn't got around to buying this book. Posted by Christine on March 26, 9: If you're interested in Lego Mindstorms robots, here's a chance to see a robot competition over the web.

Posted by Christine on April 12, Posted by Christine on July 2, 7: Today's challenge is to navigate through a tunnel with two left turns, sit on a pressure plate for 30 seconds and then return out through the tunnel. Posted by Christine on July 2, 9: I'm 2006 challenge kid nano robot the book has robot building instructions because I have no idea if the kids are going to figure out this robot by themselves in 2006 challenge kid nano robot a couple of hours.

Posted by Christine on July 3, 9: Today's challenge was more fun to recreate. The hole in the wall was just a gap in the cardboard boxes. The kids discovered that if they were in just the right spot, they could peak around the boxes and see the basket.

We added an extra box just inside the entrance to block that view. Posted by Christine on July 4, Posted by Christine on July 5, Posted by Christine on July 8, It's Mayan Adventure week 2! Posted by Christine on August 31, 9: Use of this website is subject to the following disclaimers and Terms And Conditions. This page contains an archive of all entries posted to Creative Kids Blog in the Lego Robot category. They are listed from oldest to newest. Learning 2006 challenge kid nano robot the previous category.

Many more can be found on 2006 challenge kid nano robot main index page or by looking through the archives. Weekly Scoring One challenge is getting the kids to focus on all four areas that are part of the First Lego League challenge. Robot Competition If you're interested in Lego Mindstorms robots, here's a chance to see a robot competition over the web.

Mayan Day One Today's challenge is to navigate through a tunnel with two left turns, sit on a pressure plate for 30 seconds and then return out through the tunnel. Mayan Day Three Today's challenge was more fun to recreate. Mayan Day Four I'm not sure 2006 challenge kid nano robot today's challenge. It 2006 challenge kid nano robot very simple, but needs a delicate touch. Mayan Day Five Today's robot challenge is the most elaborate. Visit my website for Free Kids Crafts and childrens gift ideas.

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Receive a daily email with our latest content. Enter your email to subscribe: Perhaps the most impressive part of Stonehenge is how it was built. The first phase, the ditch around Stonehenge, was dug using antlers, bones and even bare hands. The bluestones, which weighed four tons each, came from over miles away. They had to be floated by boat then carried across land.

The heaviest sarsen stone weighed 50 tons and would have had to be dragged along by people. Even if people had been working continuously, it would have taken more than a year to complete. This info is from the Teaching Tools site. Posted on January 20, in General Observations Permalink.

You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post. This will be simplistic, but let's assume that the life expectancy at the time was about 30 years which may be too high, I'm not sure.

Now let's get an age distribution graph for the nation of Malawi which, sadly, still has the same life expectancy. There are about 10 million people in Malawi, and about 1. Wikipedia estimates it took 20,, man-hours to build stonehenge, including the working of the stones. If it took 30 years that's , man-hours a year. In a society of 1, people, that means involved in actual manual labour doing 3, hours a year, or about 60 hours a week.

People worked a lot harder in those days, so today you'd have to at least halve the work week to 30 hours. That would mean either:. So you would have to double the above percentages. The next question is, what type of society are we talking about? One country, or the whole world? Let's think about it:. At least, because the population will grow during that time.

The only project I can think of that big would be an interstellar spaceship. Australia could do a fairly large one and the World could probably do one half the size of the moon! Or else we could build a space elevator. Roland January 20, at Tom Mazanec January 22, at Of course we do!

We're just wasting them all on wars, car accidents, smoking, obesity and prisons. We've got our priorities wrong. If you really devoted millions of people and trillions of dollars, we could have a starship within a few decades. Think how much technology will advance in that time. Roland January 22, at Recent Posts Nano-channels for molecule delivery - and construction?

Recent Comments asian bridal on Nano-channels for molecule delivery - and construction? Aurelia on Nano-channels for molecule delivery - and construction? John on Nano-channels for molecule delivery - and construction? The first stage was a circular earth formation; the second consisted of timber being added to the circle; and the third stage was constructed of bluestones. Two hundred to years later, the sarsen stones were added.

These are taller than the bluestones and form the upside-down "u" now seen. Now, here is your Stonehenge Challenge: Calculate how much effort was required to build the full artifact man-hours, ergs, horsepower, or whatever method you choose. Determine what fraction of all available effort in that early society was used to build this structure. Apply that fraction to the total of all available effort in our modern society to arrive at a Comparable Project Potential.

Conceive a new project that would use approximately the same amount of available effort. Then tell us about your project: How would it be accomplished and what would it achieve? Comments You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post. Hey, that's a really good idea. That would mean either: Let's think about it: At least, because the population will grow during that time The only project I can think of that big would be an interstellar spaceship.

Time to get to work. Do we even have the resources material , much less the technology for that? It sounds like a lot of money, but relatively speaking, it's not much. What are the benefits? What are the risks? Safeguarding Humanity World Care.